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Little Bits of Junk, part 3 - The Phantom Librarian
Spewing out too many words since November 2003
fernwithy
fernwithy
Little Bits of Junk, part 3
Title: Little Bits of Junk
Crossover: Harry Potter/Raiders of the Lost Ark
Pairing: Neville Longbottom/Marion Ravenwood
Rating: PG.

Part One
Part Two

Okay. So far, Neville has found out that a magical artifact, the Feather of Maát, which was stolen in the 1920s from a rich man's home, was re-stolen by Voldemort and the DEs. It was replaced with a brooch that had his grandmother's name on the back. Bella shows up and attacks, accusing Gran of betraying the Heir of Slytherin. Neville is pushed through a portal and ends up in the 1920s at the rich man's home, during a party. Kingsley Shacklebolt tells him that he's gotten permission to have Neville steal the Feather and bring it back. Meanwhile, Neville meets Marion Ravenwood, the daughter of the archaeologist who found the Feather in the first place. Marion is having a rough time--rumors that she's loose have spread, and men are bothering her. Neville gets her away from one of them, and they start to spend the evening together, Marion filling Neville in about the artifacts. Meanwhile, another couple is present: Tom Riddle and Mertysa Marvolo. Mertysa seems to recognize that Neville is somewhat out of his element. When everyone sits down for dinner, Neville recognizes that she is wearing the brooch that has Gran's name on the back of it.




She smiled at him icily. "Do you like my brooch?"

Neville nodded. "It's... it's unusual. Is that an emerald?"

"Trumpery glass," Tommy Riddle said dismissively, coming back with a bottle of wine and two glasses.

"Yes, exactly," Mertysa said. "It's worth nothing in monetary sense. But my students gave it to me, so it's priceless. Their names are on the back with a little message. 'We'll never forget you, Miss Marvolo.'" She shook her head and smiled fondly--though it didn't reach her eyes. "Girls always say that though, don't we?" She looked at Marion.

Marion shrugged and reached for a piece of bread. "Not me." She drained her first cup of wine and started on a second. "You don't look like a teacher."

"I imagine that contributes to the fact that I no longer am one."

"I bet you were a fun one," Marion said. "Not stuffy, like the old man up there." She jerked her thumb at the head table, where her father was still speaking earnestly to Holmwood.

"My students seemed to think so."

"Mertysa's just a barrel of fun," Tommy Riddle said. "Nobody knows it better than I." He looked at her body in a frank and appreciative way. She didn't try to shrink away from it.

As they ate dinner, Riddle entertained the table with stories of a trip he'd taken to New York, going on about the boorishness of American manners and describing some law about alcohol with great hilarity. At one point, he was expounding on the general level of stupidity among Americans ("What would you expect, coming from our rubbish piles?"), and Neville saw Marion flexing her fingers and glaring at him.

"Excuse me," Neville said, "but Miss Ravenwood is American."

Riddle shrugged, and continued his diatribe.

Marion rolled her eyes. "Don't worry about it," she said. "I've heard it all."

After dinner, there was some sort of entertainment--Neville didn't have a clear view--and Mertysa and Riddle went off to dance together.

"Hey," Marion said, "I'm getting out of here. Come along?"

"Where are you going?"

"Dunno. The dig-stuff, probably. It's better than here, anyway."

Neville thought about it. He did need to get back to the exhibits, if he was going to have a chance of getting the Feather of Maát, but he didn't want to get Marion into any trouble if people noticed them together. He also had a feeling that the smartest thing he could do to stop it from being stolen was stick to Mertysa Marvolo. On the other hand, Marion would at least know her way around, and if Neville could get to it before Mertysa...

"Jeez, Neville. I'm not proposin' marriage, here."

He smiled. "Right. Sure. Just woolgathering."

"Well, gather back in the gallery," she said. "It's stuffy in here."

He followed her out of the crowded dining area. She took his hand without thinking to lead him while she wove through the people, and didn't let go when the crowd thinned out in the drawing room. By the time they got to the gallery where the artifacts had been set up, they were alone. The lights had been turned off, but the high, wide windows let in bright moonlight.

"It's better in here," she said. "Dad'll have my hide, probably, but he's he one who keeps draggin' me to these things. I used to like 'em, but now...?" She shrugged. "I can see those mooks anywhere. Or mooks just like 'em, anyway."

"What happened to you, Marion?" Neville asked.

"Did a dumb thing," she said. She let go of his hand and took a few steps away. "There was a guy. Cute. Really cute." She looked up at the moon wistfully. "Indiana Jones."

"His name was Indiana?"

She snorted laughter. "His name was Henry, but no one called him that. It was always Indy. Even when we..." She sighed. "God, I'm an idiot."

Neville touched her shoulder. "You're not," he said. "You're quite brilliant, I think."

"Right." She perused a row of beads. "I'm just one more piece of junk Dad totes around."

"No. Just because of this... what did you say his name was?"

"Jones."

"Jones, then. It sounds to me like he's the idiot."

Marion smiled bitterly. She had pale green eyes, striking in her dark face, and they caught the light of the moon, seeming to glow. "I don't think it's gonna get in his way, you know?" She shook her head. "No. Jones is... brilliant. You should see him in the field. He knows... God, he can find his way around anything. Dad kept wishing he was on that dig"--she jerked her chin at the house--"and then remembering that he hates him now. That's brilliant me, you know. Messed up the whole business."

"I think you're a bit drunk," Neville said. "I'm sure you're a good helper to him, and you got some good things, didn't you?"

"Yeah." She sniffed. "I found the stupid Feather, and Dad said it was the best piece. Even if no one does like it."

"How did you find it?"

Marion looked at him warily. "I like Maát, all right? I like the bit with the feather and weighing the heart and I know it's corny, okay?"

"Sure."

"So, I saw all these glyphs with her, and I followed them. Dad would've gotten to it eventually, but he was working on a different part of the dig. I just kind of went over, and there was this box, and it had glyphs on it. Something about the stupid Feather letting people see things that were far away and... dumb stuff like that."

"Sounds dangerous."

"If it were real, maybe."

"You don't believe it?"

"Sure I do. Also in the Loch Ness monster and leprechauns." She wrinkled her nose. "But I just thought... well, you know, if they were putting all the story on the box, maybe it was something good. And besides, there was a marking on it about Tanis, and Dad loves Tanis, so I brought it to him. Peace offering. It's just a stupid little piece of copper, though."

"May I see it?"

She shrugged, and led him over to the negected display. "There it is. In all its glory."

Neville peered through the glass cover. The Feather of Maát was a small, shining bit of copper, with a chip of red stone at the top. It depended from a leather headband.

"Mr. Holmwood put it on a new one to display it," Marion explained. "The old one was kind of rotted. There you have it. My big find." She gave a disdainful sniff and wandered away from it.

I could Vanish the glass, Neville thought. That would be simple enough. Vanish the glass, take it, open the window, and...

And it was Marion's big find. Her peace offering to her father. And he'd just used her to get close to it.

He was as bad as the Jones boy.

Then again, he did need to take it.

He followed Marion over to the alcove where he'd found her earlier. Newly made replicas of Egyptian clothes were displayed on mannequins here, and she was fiddling absently with an elaborately worked gold collar. "So where'd you come from, anyway?" she asked. "You've got my whole life story, and I already forgot your last name."

"Longbottom."

"Right. Longbottom. Where'd you wander in from? You don't act like you know anybody."

"I've been away at school," Neville said. "I'm on holiday, and I heard about all of this. Thought it would be a good time to say hello." He smiled, hoping it sounded more convincing to her than it did to him.

"I'm glad you did," she said, and came around the mannequin. "It's been awhile since I met someone nice. I was starting to think nice boys were a myth." She took the gold collar--really, mostly a necklace--off the mannequin and draped it around her own neck. "What do you think? Could I pass for an Egyptian princess?"

Neville laughed. "I think so."

"Let me see." She scrambled around him to look in a large standing mirror, and smiled at her reflection. "Hey, hold it on for me."

Neville went over to her and held the back of the collar together while she swept her hair up and posed in the mirror. "Oh, yes," she said. "There we have it. Queen Marion-tiri." She turned, letting the collar slip and catch on the neckline of her dress, pulling it down further than it probably was meant to go. She took Neville's hands and squeezed them. "What do you say, Neville Longbottom? Wanna be my royal consort?"

"Er..."

Marion laughed and stood her her toes to kiss his cheek. "Come on. You've done your duty as the rescuer. You can get your reward." She looped her hands behind his neck.

"Marion, I don't expect any reward from you."

"I know you don't." She raised herself onto her toes again and pressed a kiss onto his mouth. "That's why I want to give you one."

Neville pushed her away gently. "You've had too much to drink..."

"You don't think I'm pretty?"

"I think you're beautiful, but--"

"But not good enough for the likes of you?"

"No! You just... you don't have to do that. I like talking to you."

She gave him a wary look and pulled away. "Fine," she said. "If that's what you want. I--"

She was interrupted by the shattering of glass.

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Comments
maple_clef From: maple_clef Date: March 10th, 2005 02:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
Drat it! I get totally engrossed in the events, and then run out of story to read. I feel quite bereft! I'm enjoying this, despite the weirdness evoked in my mind's eye which sees Film!Neville, plonked in the middle of a Hollywood matinee movie *giggles*
cornfields From: cornfields Date: March 10th, 2005 02:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ha! I can just hear Marion as I read this. Good job! I'm enjoying this immensely. :)
From: (Anonymous) Date: March 10th, 2005 02:16 pm (UTC) (Link)

Gullible first-years

Great installment as usual! Neville is just a dear - and very Gryffindor-noble.

I'm a bit disturbed that Gran Longbottom and her friends would consider her their favorite teacher, "living and dying for her", even in first year. Then again - think Lockhart, huh?

One wonders - did Mertysa teach Potions? *evil grin*

Shloz
persephone_kore From: persephone_kore Date: March 10th, 2005 05:26 pm (UTC) (Link)
I love this story. I don't know what else to say about this part.
the_jackalope From: the_jackalope Date: March 10th, 2005 10:48 pm (UTC) (Link)
I love Neville, and I'm so glad you've decided to tackle a story involving him. I love it so far.
5 comments or Leave a comment