?

Log in

No account? Create an account
entries friends calendar profile Previous Previous Next Next
Another Latin translation question - The Phantom Librarian
Spewing out too many words since November 2003
fernwithy
fernwithy
Another Latin translation question
For use in an actual fic this time, instead of just my own amusement. Can anyone translate into Latin:

There are many shapes to love and honor

Thanks!
43 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
(Deleted comment)
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: February 4th, 2006 06:55 pm (UTC) (Link)
I don't know--I'm always leery of mechanical translators--but it sounds good.

And I had to pause to just appreciate your icon.
volandum From: volandum Date: February 4th, 2006 06:58 pm (UTC) (Link)
aspecti amoris honorisque multi adsunt. That's open to permutation at will, by the way.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: February 4th, 2006 07:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
aspecti amoris

Would that translate roughly to "The Shapes (or aspects) of Love"?

Thanks!
minoukatze From: minoukatze Date: February 4th, 2006 07:01 pm (UTC) (Link)
My Latin's about rusty enough to induce lockjaw and I can't vouch for how correct the grammar is, but I'll give it a shot:

Formae amoris et honoris sunt.
volandum From: volandum Date: February 4th, 2006 07:02 pm (UTC) (Link)
Works as well as mine, if you just put a "many" in.
minoukatze From: minoukatze Date: February 4th, 2006 07:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
Thanks- caught that right after I hit 'post comment':)
minoukatze From: minoukatze Date: February 4th, 2006 07:02 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ack! I mean: Multae formae amoris et honoris sunt.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: February 4th, 2006 07:07 pm (UTC) (Link)
Thanks.

I think I like the sound of "Aspecti" better than "formae," but I like the brevity of this predicate part. (God, I need to take Latin.)

Would Multi aspecti amoris et honoris sunt make any grammatical sense? (I'm assuming that "multi" goes with "aspecti" as "multae" goes with "formae," which may be more of an an assumption than I should make! ;P)
minoukatze From: minoukatze Date: February 4th, 2006 07:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
Looks good to me:)
dipsas From: dipsas Date: February 4th, 2006 07:12 pm (UTC) (Link)
You can make it shorter still and skip the "sunt", if you like. However, it should be "multi aspectus": aspectus is fourth declension.
dipsas From: dipsas Date: February 4th, 2006 07:05 pm (UTC) (Link)
Hmmm. Just for fun. How about "Amor honorque specie variat", literally "love and honour differ with regards to form/shape"?
volandum From: volandum Date: February 4th, 2006 07:09 pm (UTC) (Link)
variant - love and honour are plural.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: February 4th, 2006 07:59 pm (UTC) (Link)
Don't suppose you could do one more? ;P

I'm putting a header on a family tree, sort of like the House of Black, except it would be, in this case, the house of Lupin. I'm guessing the name part would be Lupinus, but what's the house part? Domus? Familia? Some entirely unusual word that means "house" with the connotation of a long pedigree?

Thanks. :)
terrathree From: terrathree Date: February 4th, 2006 10:28 pm (UTC) (Link)
By "to love and honor" do you mean love and honor as nouns (i.e., love and honor each have many forms) or as verbs (i.e., one may love many forms and honor many forms)? Because I took them as verbs when I read your post originally; in "amoris et honoris", they're nouns, but that could make sense too now that I think of it. :-) Only, amoris and honoris are literally "of love" and "of honor". For "to" love and honor I think I'd use a dative ending (technically, it would make this a dative of possession): amori et honori sunt.

Or, if they're verbs, I would use the gerundive to show obligation (many forms ought to be loved and honored):

[Sunt] multi aspectus amandi honorandi.

You can put "et" or "atque" or "ac" for "and" between the -andi verb forms, but you can also leave it out; asyndeton is a nice effect in mottoes like this. :-)
43 comments or Leave a comment