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4/10 poetry rec, "The New Colossus" - The Phantom Librarian
Spewing out too many words since November 2003
fernwithy
fernwithy
4/10 poetry rec, "The New Colossus"
Most people know bits of this sonnet from the Statue of Liberty, but they're so iconic that they're rarely printed in the context of the whole poem. So here's Emma Lazarus:

The New Colossus

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor, that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

Emma Lazarus


I know immigration is a hot-button issue right now, but I don't feel very political at the moment; I just like the poem.

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Comments
From: anatomiste Date: April 10th, 2006 02:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
That is an amazing poem, and I always forget about it.

You might have noticed that I'm doing a poem a day for April, too; I wasn't sure which poem to post today--do you mind if I copy you and post this one?
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: April 10th, 2006 02:34 pm (UTC) (Link)
That's fine with me!

(I haven't been keeping up with my f-list very much for some reason... I'll have to check it out!)
akashasheiress From: akashasheiress Date: April 10th, 2006 02:37 pm (UTC) (Link)
That's a very moving poem.
gabrielladusult From: gabrielladusult Date: April 10th, 2006 03:16 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ever seen the musical, Miss Liberty? I saw it when I was young at a community theater. It puts the last five lines (Starting with "Give me your tire, your poor..." to music -- I can never read them now without singing in my head.

Today, probably because I am attempting Zacharias Smith/Susan Bones flangst, this reminds me of Hufflepuff house and their most welcoming philosophy.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: April 10th, 2006 03:36 pm (UTC) (Link)
Oh, that's an icon waiting to be made--Lady Liberty is a Hufflepuff!
gabrielladusult From: gabrielladusult Date: April 10th, 2006 03:52 pm (UTC) (Link)
LOL! I'll leave that to someone more technically minded person (also, a Hufflepuff). What other famous statues can we sort? Michelangelo's David was a Gryffindor...Rodin's Thinker was clearly a Ravenclaw...etc.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: April 10th, 2006 03:57 pm (UTC) (Link)
Could we call Venus (of di Milo fame) a Slytherin?
persephone_kore From: persephone_kore Date: April 10th, 2006 03:57 pm (UTC) (Link)
Slytherin's got a canonical statue, but it's just not the same. ;)
keestone From: keestone Date: April 10th, 2006 04:14 pm (UTC) (Link)
How about Donatello's Judith and Holofernes for Slytherin?
aeljn From: aeljn Date: April 10th, 2006 11:16 pm (UTC) (Link)
The biter bit?
keestone From: keestone Date: April 11th, 2006 12:26 am (UTC) (Link)
biter?

Sorry, not sure what you mean.
aeljn From: aeljn Date: April 11th, 2006 05:07 am (UTC) (Link)
Sorry, snakes bite and Judith tricked and killed a man who had, putting it in old-fashioned terms, dishonorable intentions against her.
keestone From: keestone Date: April 11th, 2006 11:00 am (UTC) (Link)
Ah right. I was thinking more vaguely in terms of someone with the ruthlessness to seize whatever advantage is necessary, even if it isn't necessarily considered honourable. She did behead him while he was in a drunken stupor, after all. Slytherins do seem to share a disregard for the Queensberry rules.
leapin_jot From: leapin_jot Date: April 10th, 2006 04:06 pm (UTC) (Link)
That's a beautiful poem. I don't think I've read it too often in its complete form. Thanks for sharing that! :)
matril From: matril Date: April 10th, 2006 08:14 pm (UTC) (Link)
I've never seen the entire poem before, and I like it a lot. I think it does well to view iconic phrases in their original context. I'm always somewhat bemused that we only ever sing the first verse of the Star-Spangled Banner even though it ends with a question that the 2nd and 3rd verses offer an answer to. I know, I know, it's long enough with just the one verse...but it's only part of the story. Just a little rant of mine.
From: (Anonymous) Date: April 10th, 2006 11:20 pm (UTC) (Link)
Did you, too, learn the "Star Spangled Banner" from the Armed Forces Hymnal or some other censored source? The 4th verse is my personal favorite, but I'm weak on the bloodthirsty 3rd verse because I have it in my old Girl Scouts manual.

http://www.contemplator.com/america/ssbanner.html
matril From: matril Date: April 11th, 2006 03:25 pm (UTC) (Link)
Naw, we just sing the first, third and fourth verses in church on patriotic days - I don't think the third is included in the hymnal, so I tend to forget about it. But I really like the other verses.
From: (Anonymous) Date: April 10th, 2006 11:22 pm (UTC) (Link)
Darn, you beat me to it!

Years ago, I memorized it to recite (as entertainment) at a coworker's fashion show. I walked off when I finished and later discovered I'd puzzled the audience because I didn't bow or anything to indicate that that was the end. It stunned me because I'd assumed the poem was too well known to need that.
aeljn From: aeljn Date: April 10th, 2006 11:23 pm (UTC) (Link)
Sigh -- I forgot to click on "log in" and thus my last two comments are "anonymous".
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