?

Log in

No account? Create an account
entries friends calendar profile Previous Previous Next Next
Teddy Lupin and the Hunter's Moon, Chapter 19: The Stain, pt. 1 - The Phantom Librarian
Spewing out too many words since November 2003
fernwithy
fernwithy
Teddy Lupin and the Hunter's Moon, Chapter 19: The Stain, pt. 1
Chapter 11 of FG is at the Quill, with a few little corrections, and... something else I'm forgetting. I know I did something with a paragraph. Anyway, it's up. It's the first chapter of Christmas at Harry's.

Here, they've survived a rather major werewolf assault--three at Hogwarts, with special powers, several scattered around the countryside. Teddy barely got away from one. Now, they need to regroup, and Greyback probably does as well.

Table of Contents and Summary So Far




The werewolf attacks were the front page of the next day's Daily Prophet, of course. Altogether, the Aurors had caught eight werewolves, and interrogation of the imprisoned members of the pack suggested that there were fewer than a dozen left. "But their ranks," Rita Skeeter wrote ominously, "were nearly repleted by the end of the night, with four healthy British children stolen away in the dead of night..."

The children's names were not familiar to Teddy, except in the way names of pure-blood families nearly always were--a Fawcett, a Catchlove, a McDougal, and Derwent. None of them had any particular reason to be targeted, and hadn't done anything to protect themselves. The Derwent family had been slaughtered. The Fawcetts were interviewed, and seemed to blame the Aurors for not being there, and complained that they, like the Overbys, had been hit for being too close to a target's home (in their case, the Burrow). Several other families, who'd been saved by the Aurors, were also interviewed, but of course, they didn't get Rita Skeeter's byline. At the Ravenclaw table, Geoffrey was expounding to the first years about what sort of business had probably gone into the interrogation, at least until Franklin--Teddy was quite thankful for this--told him to shut his trap for once. In Charms, Franklin came to work with Teddy, and said that he understood the situation better now, though he still wished werewolves were treated better. Teddy shrugged and said, "You'll have no argument from me," then got another rock, as the first one they'd been trying to charm had scampered off the table and was presently hiding under a dusty cupboard.

The next day, letters had poured in from families all over Britain who'd called Aurors and been saved. One of the editors used them to make a map. They estimated at least eight different paths. The one at Hogwarts was singular, and another attempt, involving two werewolves, had been made on Ministry headquarters (like Hogwarts, it had been left in the care of non-Aurors--in the case of the Ministry, Maddie's department--the Unspeakables--had trapped both attackers in a mirror. The picture of this in the Prophet was frightening indeed, though the text said that both had reverted to human form, and were now trying to arrange a release. Single wolves had roamed the countryside, looking for victims in the Cambrian Mountains, on the Bodmin Moor, outside Donegal, near Loch Shin, in the Pennines, and on the Isle of Wight. There was no rhyme or reason to these choices, at least according to the paper. They were just "soft." Whatever that meant.

"I can't imagine what they thought they were doing on the Isle of Wight," Uncle Harry said as they walked toward the Shrieking Shack. "It's not as though it's on the way to somewhere, and there's no reason for her to have started them there."

"Maybe they were looking for a holiday home," Teddy suggested. He was walking on a series of uneven stones at the side of the road, slowing them down, but more determined than he had been to cure himself of his clumsiness. It had been nothing but good luck that had kept him from jumping straight into Konrad the werewolf. "You know, pretty scenery, lot of tourists to hunt for sport if they go during the Bestival."

"It's as reasonable as anything else I can think of." They stopped at the gate, and Uncle Harry waited for Teddy to open the house. "I've decided not to lecture you," he said as they went in. "You know where you went wrong, and I'd rather work on your Stunning Spell. Also, Ginny said she was quite explicit in her scold."

"She was right." Teddy closed the door and looked around. "Lee said she was there when my mother went off onto the grounds. That she tried to stop her."

"Yes."

"Does she know why Mum left?"

Uncle Harry frowned. "I've told you everything we've been able to piece together. Your mum was fighting beside Ginny. She saw something down below and ran off."

"D'you think it was Dad?" Teddy asked. "I mean, do you think she ran off because she thought she could save him?"

"I don't know. They were found together, and Dean saw her running out, but no one knows if that's why she came out of the castle."

"I, er... heard that she really liked these stupid romance books, where the heroines are always rushing off to save the heroes. Do you suppose she ran off because she thought it would be like the books?" Teddy did his best to keep his voice even, but Uncle Harry still looked suspicious.

"I think," he said, "that if your mum liked that sort of story--and I didn't know that about her--that it was because that was the sort of person she was. She believed in jumping right into things. Trying to help."

"Oh."

"She's quite a lot like someone else I can think of just now."

"Only Lee and George were otherwise occupied."

Uncle Harry sighed and sat down on one of the parlor chairs they'd repaired. "Teddy, your mum was a skilled Auror, not a thirteen year old who hadn't mastered a Stunning Spell yet. Whatever happened, it wasn't because there was no one to rescue her. My suspicion is that Bellatrix caught her in a weak moment, not that Tonks did anything she oughtn't have. She was just overwhelmed, like all of us were."

Teddy nodded, then took a deep breath. "You said we'd work on Stunning Spells."

"Right." Uncle Harry looked troubled, but didn't push the subject any further. They spent the next two hours Stunning each other, and by the end, Teddy thought he'd mastered it fairly well. Uncle Harry said that it wouldn't work against a transformed werewolf, which was a powerfully magical creature, but that it should work perfectly well against Greyback if he showed up in human form.

Teddy thought that the subject of Mum and what had happened on the night of the Battle of Hogwarts had been safely left behind, but as they walked back to Hogwarts in the damp February night, Uncle Harry seemed to brace himself, and said, "Teddy, are you angry?"

"At what?"

"At your mother."

"No," Teddy said.

"Are you sure?"

"Yes."

"Because she was a good woman, and brave woman, and she loved you and your dad."

"And bad romance novels," Teddy said.

Uncle Harry stopped, his eyes narrowed. "Yes. I suppose, if you say so. She also liked wearing her hair pink, and collected used clothes at Oxfam. Your granny once told me that she had six Muggle wedding dresses."

"I know. I've seen them. I don't know what I'm meant to do with her wardrobe."

"You could give it back to Oxfam."

"No."

"Or you could wait until you grow up, and pass it on to a daughter to play with. Tonks would like that a lot. Teddy, she's not dead because she liked bad books, any more than she's dead because she tripped on her trainer laces. She's dead because it was a war, and she was fighting it. Stop driving yourself mad trying to come up with some other reason."

"I was reading one of them," Teddy confessed. "It was what she was reading right before the battle. She still had a bookmark in it!"

"Did you enjoy the book?"

"Well... yes."

"Do you think she did?"

"I guess so. She read the whole series."

"Then that's something good and nice to know about her. Hold onto it."

"But--"

"Teddy."

He looked very stern, and Teddy relented. "All right."

Uncle Harry hooked an arm around his neck. "All right, then. Teddy, do me a favor."

"What?"

"Re-read the book. Try to think of who she was, and why she liked it, instead of coming up with silly notions about her trying to copy it. She wasn't."

"Are you sure?"

"Teddy, you read it and liked it. Were you thinking about copying it when you jumped in front of a werewolf?"

This hadn't really occurred to Teddy. He shook his head. They reached the gate and walked up to the castle, where they said goodbye at the door. Teddy went upstairs, and opened up The Lost Treasure, which was still lying on his desk. A few minutes later, he was lost in its nonsense plot, enjoying the pirates and the battle, and the absurd island with its peace draught. He stayed up until two finishing it again, skipping some of the slow parts, but deciding to read the ending without thinking, just like it was any other book. And he liked it. It was a better ending than the one she'd actually got. He imagined her on the island, pink hair braided over her shoulders, sunning herself and drinking some silly drink from a coconut shell. Better, he put Dad there as well, in a house on stilts (to protect them from tigers, of course), and Julia and Raymond and all of the others there with them, along with Tirza, Holt, the pirates, the islanders, Sirius and Regulus Black, James and Lily Potter, Peter Pettigrew, Fred Weasley, and the Malacquis family (as it wouldn't be very interesting if no one challenged them). He overslept and missed his first class on Friday, but made it to the second one, and had a perfectly nice lunch with Ruthless and Victoire, who had been making an effort to get along since Fleur had tied them to one another during the battle.

After his last class, he went back to his room and wrote a story for James, about Julia and Raymond, a brother and sister who lived on a special island. A Lethifold came and ate everyone, but they tracked it down and magically made it cough everyone back up. Then they captured the Lethifold, which was a large, flat black thing that mimicked a night-time shadow before slipping over people in their beds and leaving no trace of them behind. With all of their brothers and sisters and friends, which the Lethifold had sicked up, they killed it, then dyed it bright yellow and decorated it with pink and purple spots and smiling stick people. And forever after, he finished, it waved a friendly welcome to everyone who came to visit. The end.

He decided that next Thursday, after his lesson, it would be time to get serious about cleaning up the Shrieking Shack.
38 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
Page 1 of 2
[1] [2]
dudley_doright From: dudley_doright Date: November 26th, 2007 05:45 am (UTC) (Link)
oh, Teddy *sighs*
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 06:17 am (UTC) (Link)
Yeah.
rdprice29 From: rdprice29 Date: November 26th, 2007 06:02 am (UTC) (Link)
I just....love this story and I love your writing and I love you!

Great job on this section. I don't have much else to say, really...



Except I forgot last time to tell you how much I absolutely loved Ruthless's punishment for trying to escape was being bound to Victoire and James for however long. I really like Fleur...she has a lot of hidden depths, I think, especially how you write her, even in a 'throwaway' moment.

Great job!

Edited at 2007-11-26 06:02 am (UTC)
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 06:19 am (UTC) (Link)
Thanks!

I think that the fact that Fleur was the chosen champion from a major school says a lot about her, and the fact that she was willing to give up her points when she failed to rescue her sister says even more. I wasn't in the least bit surprised when she turned out to--gosh--actually love Bill.
willowbough From: willowbough Date: November 26th, 2007 06:06 am (UTC) (Link)
Nice how you still manage to retain an element of tension even in the regrouping chapters. It's sobering to see that, even with the Aurors on full alert, Greyback still did an appalling amount of damage by taking four more children. I'm looking forward to the moment when he's finally stopped for good.

Glad to see that Teddy is opening up to someone about his confused feelings towards Tonks and that Harry is perceptive enough to figure out that on some level his godson is very angry at his mother and needs to resolve that anger.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 06:21 am (UTC) (Link)
Damaging soft targets is appallingly easy, because guards can't be everywhere at once.

Harry had enough people to be angry at that it never occurred to him to be angry at James and Lily (who were, after all, sensibly in hiding at the time they were attacked without provocation). Not only are Tonks and Remus dead, so are the people who directly killed them, and the man who caused it all. Teddy doesn't have anyone to direct that anger at.
marikenobi From: marikenobi Date: November 26th, 2007 06:11 am (UTC) (Link)
Oh Teddy don't worry about it, you are not the only one who keeps asking those questions ;)

As usual great Uncle Harry/ Teddy moment
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 06:21 am (UTC) (Link)
you are not the only one who keeps asking those questions ;)

Yeah, Teddy keeps asking them for the same reason the rest of us do, I think!
alkari From: alkari Date: November 26th, 2007 06:17 am (UTC) (Link)
Another great couple of chapters - I have been away for a few days, and caught up on three at once, LOL. Love the story about the Lethifold being forced to sick up its victims, then being dyed yellow and decorated - bound to appeal to young James. And poor Teddy does really need to get a better grip on the present and let go of the past and his imaginings.

BTW, minor typo in first para. here - I think it should be 'replenished' and not 'repleted' in Rita's article.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 06:26 am (UTC) (Link)
And poor Teddy does really need to get a better grip on the present and let go of the past and his imaginings.

Especially the harmful ones, like trying to figure out what tiny thing his parents could have done differently. There's a good sequence in Stephen King's Needful Things about the hero, who lost his wife and son in a single-car accident. He keeps obsessing about why his wife wasn't wearing her seatbelt. Was something supernatural going on? Was she demented and trying to kill herself and their son? What happened before the car crashed? And of course, the monster in the novel tries to sell him a bill of goods about it, to answer those questions. He makes a mistake--in his version, the seatbelt is on--which Alan twigs to with the help of his current girlfriend. When he asks how she knew what Gaunt had tried to sell him, she says, "What other completely useless thing would you think you couldn't live without?" That always struck me, because it goes into the human tendency to want to try to fix things. Except that it's way too late to fix it. What possible use is it to Teddy to know if Tonks died because her shoe was untied, or because she didn't see Bellatrix stepping out of the shadows? What's he going to do with that information except torture himself?
mrs_norris_mous From: mrs_norris_mous Date: November 26th, 2007 06:57 am (UTC) (Link)
"lot of tourists to hunt for sport if they go during the Bestival."

That's Festival, surely they could work out if the festival was on, its only three days. Unless its a gun on the wall for later this is a bit strange.

Thanks again.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 11:49 am (UTC) (Link)
Actually, I was going for local flavor. Teddy's just joking (in rather poor taste).
prelud From: prelud Date: November 26th, 2007 07:20 am (UTC) (Link)
Ruthless and Victoire, who had been making an effort to get along since Fleur had tied them to one another during the battle.
*giggle*
I rather like adult!Fleur. I wish she appeared more often in fics (your or soeone else`s).
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 11:50 am (UTC) (Link)
I like Fleur, but I've never really felt compelled to write a lot about her.
jedi_chick From: jedi_chick Date: November 26th, 2007 09:10 am (UTC) (Link)
The map of the various paths the werewolves took sounds pretty fascinating. I'm glad that people were reporting on the effectiveness of the Aurors in contrast to Rita Skeeter's article.

Harry continues to be an awesome adult. It's wonderful that he took the time to encourage Teddy to work through his anger about Tonks and the book, and that Teddy was able to come to terms with it a little bit.

I hope that when they both grow up, James and Teddy cowrite an adventure story. They both tell such fun, creative stories.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 11:52 am (UTC) (Link)
I hope that when they both grow up, James and Teddy cowrite an adventure story.

I think that they do that, maybe even a whole series of them, under a pseudonym, while they're both working at their respective jobs. It starts out as a lark, but Victoire encourages them to publish it because it's fun.
amamama From: amamama Date: November 26th, 2007 09:11 am (UTC) (Link)
*sigh* Oh, Teddy dear - will you now be able to stop obsessing over the things you can't change? Great Harry/Teddy moment, both here and in the previous instalment. And great start on his animagus. :) Loved it, as always.

Cheers!
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 11:54 am (UTC) (Link)
will you now be able to stop obsessing over the things you can't change?

He may. And he might well start to think about things he can change. Not all of which would necessarily be approved by Harry's stoic post-war philosophy. But that's a different story, not this one.
lollapulizer From: lollapulizer Date: November 26th, 2007 03:05 pm (UTC) (Link)
Teddy should be a writer. He certainly enjoys making up stories for the Potter children!

Hopefully Teddy will deal better with his parents death now that he's thinking of the Tirza story in a new way.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 03:45 pm (UTC) (Link)
Of course, he's still thinking that, if forced, the lethifold may sick up everyone it swallowed.
etain_antrim From: etain_antrim Date: November 26th, 2007 04:15 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yet another great section. I love your Harry more than JKR's! Maybe that's because he's an adult in your story, but for whatever reason, he's wise and not irritating with it and an excellent godfather. But my heart still aches for Teddy's need to find peace with his parents death.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 04:34 pm (UTC) (Link)
What peace is there to make? I think that's the problem. "Accepting death," a la Harry, is a lot easier when it's your own death you're contemplating, or the end of someone's long and painful illness. (There's a difference, for instance, between Harry accepting the notion of his own mortality and choosing to die for his beliefs and Voldemort accepting Harry's mortality and deciding to kill him. Or even in, say, Ron accepting that Harry had to go die--there was a good thematic reason not to have Harry share this intelligence with Ron and Hermione: it would have been inhuman if they hadn't put up the biggest fuss in the history of fusses.) Accepting a murder (Tonks) and a violent death in a battle (Remus)... that's something else. It's like deciding accept that "these things just happen." It may keep you sane once it has happened, but it offends that human spirit to accept it as a general principle.

Edited at 2007-11-26 04:35 pm (UTC)
From: kobegrace Date: November 26th, 2007 05:30 pm (UTC) (Link)
This is good. This was right. Like a delicate yet refreshing gelato in between the main courses. Wonderful job. :)

Although the petite Maddie reference made me realise just how profoundly I've missed Frankie... :(
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 05:33 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yeah, I'm sorry about that, too. I miss Frankie, but there hasn't been as much space for him in this particular story as I'd like. It can be taken for granted that he's still fretting about exams, running games, and generally being a good egg.
(Deleted comment)
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 07:07 pm (UTC) (Link)
So do I. :)
From: (Anonymous) Date: November 26th, 2007 06:39 pm (UTC) (Link)

The Burrow

Another great section.

I'm just wondering, though, why the Burrow was seen as a target, specifically? We haven't heard anything of Molly or Arthur (I hope you have them well!) even though so many of their children and grandchildren are right in the thick of things. Perhaps it's just that, or is there some particular reason for them to be targetted?

And if the Aurors had had a detachment there, even if it had done good, I'm sure Rita Skeeter would have said it was only nepotism!
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 26th, 2007 07:11 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: The Burrow

As a place of importance to the head of the Auror division, who also happens to have been instrumental in the war, it's a reasonable target to assume, though not necessarily on the "a-list." Arthur and Molly (who are fine) were probably just up at St. Mungo's, helping watch the patients. But the Fawcetts wanted to blame someone, so they blamed the Weasleys for not being there.
tree_and_leaf From: tree_and_leaf Date: November 26th, 2007 11:17 pm (UTC) (Link)
"But their ranks," Rita Skeeter wrote ominously, "were nearly repleted by the end of the night, with four healthy British children stolen away in the dead of night..."

Unless you're getting at Rita's bad style, I think ' replenished' would work better here.

The one at Hogwarts was singular, and another attempt, involving two werewolves, had been made on Ministry headquarters (like Hogwarts, it had been left in the care of non-Aurors--in the case of the Ministry, Maddie's department--the Unspeakables--had trapped both attackers in a mirror.

This sentence has got a bit confused!

But as ever, I'm realliy enjoying both the spot-on characterisation and the exciting plot.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: November 27th, 2007 04:08 am (UTC) (Link)
You and alkari are right about "replenished."

Yeah, I really need to stop nesting sentences like little Russian stacking dolls.
38 comments or Leave a comment
Page 1 of 2
[1] [2]