?

Log in

No account? Create an account
entries friends calendar profile Previous Previous
The Phantom Librarian
Spewing out too many words since November 2003
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four


The Road Home (Coco): Chapter FiveCollapse )
1 comment or Leave a comment
So... I'm kind of trying to figure out how the hacienda is laid out from stopping the film and looking at every angle I see. (It's one thing to set something in the land of the dead where no one knows where something might show up. It's another to have someone who's lived in the same hacienda his entire life not be able to explain fairly specifically where things are.

The shoe shop is against the street, with a work window and two doors facing outward, and around the corner, there's a regular window and what seems to be a door from the street on the other side. It also has a back door leading to the courtyard where the well is. Directly across from it, we know there's the ofrenda room next to a gate, with a little shade tree that Mama Coco is sitting under at the beginning (probably where Miguel demonsrates his running technique to her, too). Beside the ofrenda room is what looks like a long open dining and kitchen area, which leads to a wall in the middle of the courtyard with a big arch in it. When we see Luisa spreading the petals, you can just see a bit of the shop truck through the arch, so there must be an entrance big enough for vehicles, and we know from the shot of Dante climbing that it's near the truck where you can climb up to Miguel's crawlspace. There's some kind of lower building beside it before you reach the alley. You can also just see part of another outdoor room, and I think it's on that side of the wall-arch that Miguel confronts Elena outside Coco's room. Does this look at least plausible?

Also, I think there may be more rooms behind the ofrenda and dining area. Miguel didn't look like he was going outside when he snuck out of the ofrenda room from the side. There are most likely more rooms beyond what I showed, since this sort of hacienda would be essentially a closed square. Probably the truck comes through a gate.
Rough mapCollapse )
5 comments or Leave a comment
Huh. Well, I finally realized what I wasn't facing head-on with Hector's feelings. And I'm not any more sure of how to deal with it than he is!

The Road Home (Coco): Chapter FourCollapse )
10 comments or Leave a comment
Chapter One
Chapter Two

The Road Home (Coco): Chapter ThreeCollapse )
9 comments or Leave a comment
I do still read and listen to these books, even if I'm not writing in the fandom anymore.

So...
1. Why in the name of God does Jim Dale give Bellatrix and Narcissa a French accent? From her first book, we knew Bellatrix was Hogwarts educated, even if the timeline was fuzzy. Later on, we find that she's a British witch named Black. So... why did no one say, "Uh, Jim? The Normans were long gone by the time Bellatrix came around..." Heck, even her husband was mentioned as a Hogwarts student, so he wasn't French either, despite the name.

2. Wouldn't Ollivander remember her as Bellatrix Black when identifying her wand, rather than as Lestrange?

3. How did the founders of Hogwarts have heritable surnames centuries before that fad caught on in Britain? How did this make any kind of historical sense? (This bugs me on the same level a the Rivera conundrum in Coco -- I can make it work because I have to, but why do I have to?)

4. Speaking of history, witch burnings coincided more with the Reformation era than the middle ages. So why were they focused on the middle ages in History of Magic?
6 comments or Leave a comment
Chapter One

The Road Home (Coco): Chapter TwoCollapse )
6 comments or Leave a comment
Okay. So, this may come slowly and the first chapter may get some edits as I get the feel for it. (Enrique's voice isn't quite as completely clear in my head as Imelda's was.) But it's picking up in the movie's "skip year." For some reason, this movie makes me want to write 'mirror stories,' and it will go back and forth with the land of the dead, but probably not with the interlocking sentences like the last one.

The Road Home: Chapter OneCollapse )
6 comments or Leave a comment
Okay, finished a fic. I don't quite feel like doing ficlets (and I keep fizzling out on them, anyway), but how about celebrating with a little ask the characters. Ask the characters whatever you want!
27 comments or Leave a comment
Why yes, I am still still working on this.

So, I'm trying to get both Hector and Miguel being Riveras, along with Imelda (since it's her shoe business). I managed to avoid the question throughout "The Wedding Guitar," but if I go forward, it's going to be in Enrique's point of view, and it's going to have to involve actual names, since they'd most likely need to give them to authorities as they're trying to press Hector's case.

So, would it work if both Hector and Imelda began their lives with the Rivera paterno? As orphans, they might have just been assigned a name, and probably not given maternos. (Is that how that would work? I guess that wouldn't have much impact, since the maternos would have long since dropped away, anyway, but out of curiosity.)

That would make Coco Socorro (or maybe Maria de Socorro) Rivera Rivera. In the case of a doubled name like that, would the second just typically be dropped? Then when she got married, she'd be Socorro Rivera Rivera de [Julio's paterno].

From there, it's just a question of one more coincidental Rivera happening: Franco, Elena's husband. Elena would be Elena [Julio's paterno] Rivera de Rivera, which would make Miguel's father once again a Rivera -- Enrique Rivera [Julio's paterno] -- and Miguel also a Rivera -- Miguel Rivera [Luisa's paterno], both using Rivera as the general short form.

So it's three unrelated people in the same town having the same name, two marrying each other and a third marrying their granddaughter. Given that it's Rivera and not, like, Espigares, it's not impossible. Though it's still more gymnastics than I'd be likely to do on my own for a story! But does it make at least a modicum of sense of the names?
5 comments or Leave a comment
Woo-hoo, made it to the end. With a big time jump.

Question: The logical place for this story to end, really, is with the line where Coco and Imelda walk away from the cemetery. But I couldn't get the xolo dog out of my head. Should I end it at the logical place, or, for no apparent reason other than my brain being weird, end with Dante's ancestors?

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11
Part 12
The Wedding Guitar, pt 13 (Coco)Collapse )
12 comments or Leave a comment
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11

He put his feet down and wiped half-heartedly at the little pile of dust they'd shaken off. "You've been crying. Your eyes are puffy."

"I got pepper juice in my eyes."

"Imelda…"

"Let it be, Oscar. Whatever I did today, it is done. And there is nothing further to be said."


Oscar looked like he might argue, but Felipe came out of the bathroom and ordered him in instead. The evening's life began, as it did every other evening. The twins promised Imelda to go looking for wives soon. Coco came out, looking a bit wan, but joining in the conversation enthusiastically when she learned the subject. She made lists of all of her requirements for their wives, and began naming their children (who had to be born in pairs, of course). Imelda let it all roll on around her.

The family would be all right.

In the end, nothing else mattered.

It was almost midnight when the twins went back out to their cabins, and Coco
The Wedding Guitar, pt 12 (Coco)Collapse )
7 comments or Leave a comment

In the interest of getting an index up for someone who was interested (and I know I've done this before, but I can't find it!), this is the table of contents for the second James Potter story, The Secret of Ville-Sauvage.


The Secret of Ville-SauvageCollapse )

Tags:

1 comment or Leave a comment
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10

Then, with a decisive move, she put the family portrait in there as well.

She slammed it shut and pushed it away.

Then she went to Coco's room to comfort her from whatever nightmare had woken her up.


Coco was shivering in her bed, looking out at the moonlit courtyard. She looked up with a start when Imelda came in. "Mamá…"

"It's alright, Coco."

"There was a monster, and he burned up Papá."

"Here, let me light your lamp," Imelda said, going over and igniting the wick. "There, you see. No monsters."

"He was going to eat up my head."

"There are no monsters, Coco." She sat down on Coco's bed and put a cool hand on her forehead. "You're safe."

"Could I have a song?"

"Coco…"

"Please, Mamá."

Imelda tried to start Héctor's lullaby, but it wouldn't come out of her throat. Instead, she managed a verse of Arroro, mi niña, cuddling Coco tightly and brushing her hair with aching fingers. Her voice was weak and out of practice, but Coco responded to it, putting one small hand on Imelda's throat, as if to feel the sound. She tried to feel Héctor somewhere nearby, tried to convince herself that there was a miracle, but he wasn't there. She couldn't feel him anywhere.

When she finished, she kissed Coco's head and rocked her until she fell asleep again.

Oscar had come back into the house while she was singing, and he was looking at her with great concern. "What's happening, Imelda? I heard you singing."

"Just a lullaby."

"You haven't sung for a long time."

"No. I should not. It hurts." She looked out the window. There was a vague sound of the party in the square, and up the hill toward the church, she could see the candlelight from the cemetery, where people were still coming and going. "I just don't understand why

The Wedding Guitar, pt 11 (Coco)Collapse )
10 comments or Leave a comment
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
The Wedding Guitar, pt 10 (Coco)Collapse )
18 comments or Leave a comment
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

The Wedding Guitar, pt 9 (Coco)Collapse )
9 comments or Leave a comment
Again, I added enough to the scene transition to put under the cut! Oh, well. No one will ever accuse me of over-pruning my prose.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7


The Wedding Guitar, pt 8 (Coco)Collapse )
4 comments or Leave a comment
Back to the story, and 1931, where Coco, before being interrupted by a flashback, was being led back through Santa Cecilia by her mother, who went upstairs, stormed around a little bit, and came back, claiming to have calmed down, and asking if Coco is ready to talk.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6


Papá had been singing for two whole verses when Tío Nesto came over with a little man who wore round, shiny glasses that flashed in the sun. Tío Nesto was waving his arms wildly, as if they wouldn't notice him otherwise.

"Héctor!" he called. "I have good news! This is
The Wedding Guitar, pt 7 (Coco)Collapse )
6 comments or Leave a comment
Okay, I was browsing around on TV Tropes and got to one that was about shipping. I don't remember which. (These are things that just get me thinking.) The comment was, "Sure, the shipper thinks she wants the couple to get together and not have problems, just cuddle on the couch, but then what is there to do? You need conflict!"

And I kind of scratched my head because, well... we're not talking about stories where the ship is the point.
Read more...Collapse )
8 comments or Leave a comment
Okay, I added quite a bit before the segue point, so it's all under the cut, with what was in the last section underlined as usual. I've started posting on AO3, so I picked up a little formatting to signify the chapter numbers and the years in question.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

The Wedding Guitar, pt 6 (Coco)Collapse )
12 comments or Leave a comment
Okay, so this may be a smidge longer than anticipated, because another voice had to come in here. After all, Imelda's not the only one who'd know that song...

In the 1931 "now" storyline (not the flashback interludes), pretty much all that's happened is that Imelda has dressed up in Hector's old mariachi uniform to go watch Ernesto's first movie. Other people were coming in. She recognized that the opening song was "Remember Me." (I realized that I'd put in a different movie title back in part 1, so I changed it there.)

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Repeated part underlined, then when the underline is over, it's new.

She sang because Hector's music called her to sing, because the words he'd written were meant only for her, because it was his heart and his soul, and they were also hers. She sang to the strangers in the seats, but mostly she sang to Hector, her husband (in all but the most technical of senses). And it was theirs, only theirs, and no one could

The Wedding Guitar, pt 5 (Coco)Collapse )
5 comments or Leave a comment