FernWithy (fernwithy) wrote,
FernWithy
fernwithy

4/21 poetry rec

Keeping with the not-originally-in-English theme (and I will get to a Psalm eventually), here's a favorite Hebrew poem, usually sung--you can hear a cantor singing it at this page, as well as see it in Hebrew letters. It's very brief. The title is "Eili, Eili," or in English, "Oh, Lord, my God." (Actually, "My God, My God," but the English is translated to the former. It also translates "the prayer of man" into "the prayer of the heart.") By Hannah Senesh

Eili Eili
Shelo yigameir l'olam,
Hachol v'hayam
rishrush shel hamayim,
B'rak hashamyim
t'filat ha-adam.


O Lord, my God,
I pray that these things shall never end.
The sand and the sea,
the rush of the waters,
the crash of the heavens,
the prayer of the heart.


Anyone who knows Hebrew better than I do is more than welcome to point out where the translation isn't exactly literal.

(EDIT: Heh, didn't notice until I c/p'd that this site does translate it as "prayer of man." I've never actually heard it that way! So I changed the translation to what I know. Even though I know what I know is a very bizarre way to render that particular translation.)

(EDIT 2: HA!!! I just looked at the credits on the page, and one of the site coders is a guy I used to write with!)
Tags: national poetry month
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